ConcurrentDictionary<TKey,TValue> used with Lazy<T>

In a recent thread on the MSDN forum for the TPL, Stephen Toub suggested mixing ConcurrentDictionary<T,U> with Lazy<T>.  This provides a fantastic model for creating a thread safe dictionary of values where the construction of the value type is expensive.  This is an incredibly useful pattern for many operations, such as value caches.

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C# 5 Async, Part 3: Preparing Existing code For Await

While the Visual Studio Async CTP provides a fantastic model for asynchronous programming, it requires code to be implemented in terms of Task and Task<T>.  The CTP adds support for Task-based asynchrony to the .NET Framework methods, and promises to have these implemented directly in the framework in the future.  However, existing code outside the framework will need to be converted to using the Task class prior to being usable via the CTP.

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C# 5 Async, Part 2: Asynchrony Today

The .NET Framework has always supported asynchronous operations.  However, different mechanisms for supporting exist throughout the framework.  While there are at least three separate asynchronous patterns used through the framework, only the latest is directly usable with the new Visual Studio Async CTP.  Before delving into details on the new features, I will talk about existing asynchronous code, and demonstrate how to adapt it for use with the new pattern.

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C# 5 Async, Part 1: Simplifying Asynchrony – That for which we await

Today’s announcement at PDC of the future directions C# is taking excite me greatly.  The new Visual Studio Async CTP is amazing.  Asynchronous code – code which frustrates and demoralizes even the most advanced of developers, is taking a huge leap forward in terms of usability.  This is handled by building on the Task functionality in .NET 4, as well as the addition of two new keywords being added to the C# language: async and await.

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Parallelism in .NET – Part 20, Using Task with Existing APIs

Although the Task class provides a huge amount of flexibility for handling asynchronous actions, the .NET Framework still contains a large number of APIs that are based on the previous asynchronous programming model.  While Task and Task<T> provide a much nicer syntax as well as extending the flexibility, allowing features such as continuations based on multiple tasks, the existing APIs don’t directly support this workflow.

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Parallelism in .NET – Part 19, TaskContinuationOptions

My introduction to Task continuations demonstrates continuations on the Task class.  In addition, I’ve shown how continuations allow handling of multiple tasks in a clean, concise manner.  Continuations can also be used to handle exceptional situations using a clean, simple syntax.

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Parallelism in .NET – Part 18, Task Continuations with Multiple Tasks

In my introduction to Task continuations I demonstrated how the Task class provides a more expressive alternative to traditional callbacksTask continuations provide a much cleaner syntax to traditional callbacks, but there are other reasons to switch to using continuations…

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Parallelism in .NET – Part 17, Think Continuations, not Callbacks

In traditional asynchronous programming, we’d often use a callback to handle notification of a background task’s completion.  The Task class in the Task Parallel Library introduces a cleaner alternative to the traditional callback: continuation tasks.

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Attached Property port of my Window Close Behavior

Nishant Sivakumar just posted a nice article on The Code Project.  It is a port of the MVVM-friendly Blend Behavior I wrote about in a previous article to WPF using Attached Properties.

While similar to the WindowCloseBehavior code I posted on the Expression Code Gallery, Nishant Sivakumar’s version works in WPF without taking a dependency on the Expression Blend SDK.

I highly recommend reading this article: Handling a Window’s Closed and Closing Events in the View-Model.  It is a very nice alternative approach to this common problem in MVVM.

2010 Visual C# MVP Award

I received a pleasant surprise today.  I was presented this morning with the 2010 Microsoft® MVP Award for Visual C#.  According to the award email, this “award is given to exceptional technical community leaders who actively share their high quality, real world expertise with others.”

I feel honored and proud to receive this award, and hope that I can continue to be a valuable member of the community in the future.  Thank you to everyone who nominated me!

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